Book Review

I’d Rather Be Reading: Book Review

The other day I was wandering around the religion section at Barnes and Noble, when I spotted a pretty little book, tucked in between some really humdrum-looking titles.  It caught my eye, as the cover was face out and, like I said, beautiful.

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See?  Beautiful.

I immediately picked it up upon recognizing the author, Anne Bogel.  She’s the creator of Modern Mrs. Darcy, a fun website that I’ve perused for book titles.  I’ve also heard her interviewed on Sarah Mackenzie’s podcasts.

But this particular book caught my eye not only because of it’s pretty cover, but also because of it’s snarky title and quaint size.  (It’s about as long as my hand.  I love small, hardcover books.)

I immediately and randomly flipped it open to Chapter 8 How to Organize Your Bookshelves, and I was hooked.  I love books.  And I love organizing.  But I snapped it shut.  No!  I won’t buy another book for myself.  I’m here to find something for my husband after all.  (Our anniversary was just days away.)

Somehow, though, the book stayed in my hand.

I wandered over to the Beer and Wine section.  Hmmm, maybe he hasn’t gotten me anything yet?  Maybe I should help him out and buy Anne Bogel’s book and then gave it to him, so that he can give it to me?  Yes!  That’s just it.

And that’s just what I did.  I bought the book, gave it to my husband, who gladly accepted it, and then had to wait two days before opening it at dinner on our 13th Anniversary.

Thank you, Honey!

So, I’d Rather Be Reading

I read this book in 24 hours, and this was restraining myself.  You know, like putting the book down to make supper and attending to the baby.  It was such a short, fun read, though, that I didn’t even have to lock myself in the bathroom to finish it.

But man is she crazy!  I’m not sure she sleeps at all, with all those books she’s reading, and I found this a little inspiring.  I really shouldn’t waste time putzing around on my phone or the internet.  Rather, I should just pick up a book.  And this should never be a problem either because I should keep a book on me at all times.  (Another reason that I love small, hardcovers.  They easily fit into my purse/diaper bag.)

Anyway, I thought I’d answer a few of her questions that she poses in her book.

  1. What was the last story you wished would never end?
    Easy.  My kids’ book, Jock’s Island by Elizabeth Coatsworth.  If she was still alive, I’d write her a letter and beg her to write an extended adult version.  Like 10 volumes long.  Who doesn’t like volcanoes and islands and seas and a hopeful, young couple separated by it all?
  2. Which was the last volume you hurled across the room?
    Hmmm…besides Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford?  Maybe Anthony Trollope’s The Warden.  I tried reading that one last week.  Nope.  Not gonna happen.  Boring!
  3. Can every devoted reader point back to the book that hooked them on the story?  …one that made them decide, for themselves, to make reading a part of their life, forever?
    The first book I ever remember reading, on my own, and loving, was L.M. Montomery’s Anne of Green Gables.  I still love that book.

And finally I’ll recommend Bogel’s book for the following kinds of people:

  1. Those of you who max out your library check-outs.
  2. Those of you who like to rearrange your bookshelves for the practical reason that you do not have enough space.
  3. Those of you who think Dust Jackets present a Dilemma.  (I hate them and chuck them, by the way.  If there happens to be any interesting material on them, I will cut it out and tape it to the inside cover of that book, but the rest goes.)
  4. Those of you who have “ever finished a book under the covers with a flashlight when they were supposed to be sleeping.”  (That’s Bogel’s official Book Dedication.)

In the end, I am a bit concerned for myself, however, after reading I’d Rather Be Reading.  You see, she has a chapter titled Book Bossy, and I’m afraid that I fit the bill, and this is not good.  Dear Readers, I sincerely apologize for all my bossiness.  You should pray for me.

P.S.  She’s read all of Evelyn Waugh’s books and loves Brideshead Revisited.  Ergo, she can’t be that crazy because Waugh is awesome.

Book Review, Homeschooling

Poetry & Books

Poetry

Some of you may be wondering what the children have been memorizing as of late?

Every winter there are a few poems that I like to go back to, for I think it is better to repeat poems and truly have them interiorized, rather than to continually introduce new material.

So recently my little children ages 5 and 7 just finished up Robert Louis Stevenson’s Wintertime, which can be found in his A Child’s Garden of Verses.  (This is a book that you must own, by the way, for all the poems in it are gems.)  Now the little children are memorizing Robert Frost’s Stopping By Woods on a Snowy Evening.  I can’t help liking this poem too because it’s one of the few poems I remember memorizing as a child.

The twins, age 10, have recently revisited the The Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson because my husband wanted to learn it.  It also happens to be one of their all-time favorites anyway, so they were more than happy to, “Forward, the Light Brigade!  Charge for the guns!”  Now, however, they’ve moved onto the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar, which is Psalm 43 [42].

My Eldest has been working on the Prologue to St. John’s Gospel for her homeschool coop.  She also has another poem for her online Writing and Rhetoric class, but I haven’t seen it, so I can’t tell you what it is at the moment.

Books: Read Alouds and Lunchtime with Audible

Our last two read alouds were excellent.  In fact, you should own them too.  The first was Mary Fabyan Windeatt’s The Children of Fatima.

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This true story blows me away every time I read it.  I mean, 70,000 people witnessed the Miracle of the Sun.  70,000!  And there are real newspaper photos from it.  Just google it.

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Like this one.
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Or this one.

This book is just inspiring too.  If those little children can sacrifice the way they did, then I need to step it up.

The second book we just read was also very good, but too short!  I didn’t want it to end.  It was Elizabeth Coatsworth’s Jock’s Island.  And if you can get the version illustrated by Lilian Obligado, you’ll love it even more.  The pictures are lovely.

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Check out these lovely illustrations.

On Audible we just finished listening to Ginger Pye by Eleanor Estes.  This book was entertaining, but a little sad because someone steals the children’s puppy and mistreats him.  However, it ends well.

Currently we’re listening to The Moffats, also by Eleanor Estes because the children can’t get enough of her right now.

And what about me?

I recently read Suzanne Wolfe’s The Confessions of X, which is a historical fiction account of St. Augustine’s concubine.  I was a little worried going in that it would be full of immorality, but that wasn’t the case.  I found the book entertaining, but lacking in something.  Depth, maybe?  I can’t analyze it at the moment because I have three children begging for breakfast, so maybe I’ll come back to it later.

Now I’m reading Robert Hugh Benson’s By What Authority?  It is gripping.  I love it.

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These are the other books on my list.