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Passion Sunday and Veiling Images

This Sunday is Passion Sunday.  Get your purple cloth ready!

Since many of us are on Mandatory House Arrest–how very penitential–veiling may be difficult to do, if you don’t already have your supplies ready to go.  But, there’s no need to fret after all.  I’m sure Jesus will understand if your images are veiled with some bathroom towels or an old sheet!

In any case I’ll leave you with 3 things:

  1. Here’s our mantel, which I prepared a few days early:

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    In our home, I only veil the images where we gather as a family to pray, which happens to be the living room.
  2. Earlier today, when I was minding my own business and scrambling eggs, I suddenly heard my husband laughing from our bedroom, where his makeshift office is located.  Something was obviously so hilarious that he had to call me up.  “Kim, you’ve got to see this.”  He was “on break” and watching THIS 1987 video of Rick Astley dancing.  It’s ridiculous, but made me smile.  I remember that song after all.
  3. Lastly, here’s my post from last year, for those of you unfamiliar with the beautiful tradition of veiling.

My Old Post From Last Year: Passion Sunday

There’s some crazy stuff in the Old Calendar that is just interesting to learn about.  My husband is forever telling me this.  (By Old Calendar I mean those things connected to the Traditional Latin Mass.)

For example, this coming Sunday is called Passion Sunday.  It always falls on the Sunday immediately before Palm Sunday and serves to move our thoughts toward the Passion and death of Christ.  (In the New Calendar, this Sunday is called the Fifth Sunday of Lent.)

Passion Sunday is also Judica Sunday

Now I know that the prayers of the Mass are supposed to reflect the liturgical season the Church is observing, but there’s some real beauty and depth to be found in the prayers of the Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) that I’ve never noticed before.  I’ll give you one example.

On Passion Sunday, Psalm 42 is highlighted in the Introit and pleadingly states,

“Judge me, O God, and distinguish my cause from the nation that is not holy: deliver me from the unjust and deceitful man: for Thou art God my strength.”

If you’ll remember in the TLM, Psalm 42 is also prayed every Sunday during the Prayers at the Foot of the Altar, but on Passion Sunday it’s omitted and will be until Easter Sunday.  This is something like the Gloria.  Both are omitted because they are associated with the Paschal joy of the Risen Christ.

In other words, we have this stripping away of Pascal references in order to sharpen our awareness of Christ’s Passion, which is why we refer to these final two weeks of Lent as Passiontide.

Sometimes this Sunday is also called “Judica Sunday.”  Judica being Latin for the opening word of Psalm 42, “Judge.”

It’s amazing how it all comes together.  I’ve got a lot to learn.

Veiling of Images

In any case, my children always look forward to Passion Sunday, for my family likes to observe a unique tradition that all churches used to do, and many still do.  We veil our images with purple cloth.

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Here’s our fireplace mantel.  Even though we still have two days to go, I went ahead with the purple anyway.

This tradition began sometime in the ninth century to reflect the readings of the TLM.  For example, the Gospel for Passion Sunday is always John 8 wherein the Jews take up stones to cast at Jesus, but he mysteriously passes through the crowd unseen and then hides.  Therefore, the veiling of images reminds us that Christ’s Divinity was hidden at the time of His Passion and death.

Think about that for a minute.  Again, it’s astounding how all these things come together.  Of course His Divinity was hidden!  Otherwise everyone would have believed, not just that centurion at the foot of the cross.

Secondly, veiling also strips us of visual stimuli.  Throughout the year we may become accustomed to looking at and praying with our crucifixes and icons, and so taking them away for a time helps us paradoxically to become more aware of them.

So if you’ve never done it before, try veiling a couple of images in your home.  It’s pretty easy to do.  I just bought a yard of purple cloth at Hobby Lobby and cut it into squares.  I’ve also heard of families using purple tissue paper in a pinch.

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His Mother is Weeping

Dear Readers,

This makes my heart weep.  I have no doubt Our Lady is weeping.  I wish I had the words to describe my feelings.  I don’t.  May God bless and protect that priest.

May more priests, and especially bishops, be inspired by his example.

And what about the children?  They so want to help too.  Here are a few of my children this morning:

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They drew a gigantic rosary on our driveway for all and sundry to see.  They also drew St. Michael killing Coronavirus.

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Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us.

St. Joseph, pray for us.

St. Charles Borromeo, pray for us.

St. Gregory the Great, pray for us.

St. Miguel Pro, pray for us.

Lastly, I found THIS article by canon lawyer Cathy Caridi interesting.  I’m glad people are beginning to talk about these things.

 

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My Big, Fat, Shove Tuesday

Today is the Tuesday before Ash Wednesday, which in years past was known as Shrove Tuesday.  Shrove comes from “shrive,” which means to rid oneself of one’s sins and seek penance.

In other words, have you gone to confession lately?  No?  Now’s the time!

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Go to Confession!

Nowadays we think of the day before Ash Wednesday as Fat Tuesday, wherein one eats all foods that used to be verboten during Lent: butter, eggs, fat…candy, desserts, all things richly decadent, etc., etc.

This morning, after a breakfast of toast and strudel, we drove over to Caribou and ordered Turtle Mochas for all the children and a Mint Condition for me.  It was delicious.

Tomorrow, however, we can kiss those sweets goodbye for a time.

Are you ready for Lent?

And Just For Fun:

Here are few photos from the last week or so.

Photo #1:  The New Triple Bunkbed

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The boys have been sleeping on the floor ever since we moved here because their bed hadn’t come yet.  We had ordered this Fun Thing from Wayfair, but it took a few weeks to get here.  The little girls are ragingly jealous of it.  They want one too.

Photo #2:  Kids Skipping Along With Their Cousins

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The kids’ cousins came to visit.  Of course we took them to see the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

Photo #3:  My Sister

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My sister drove all the way here and surprised me with a visit.  It was fun.

Photo #4:  My Sister Without Coffee  😉

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We had such a great time together with my brother.  I love you both.  Even without your coffee in the morning!  And even if you wear SDSU gear in Wisconsin…goodness.  One could get beat up around here for that.

Photo #4:  Grandma, Grandpa, and Another Aunt

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My husband’s family came to visit too.  Guess where we took them?*

We also went hiking at Great River Bluffs State Park.  I can’t wait to do that again.  It’s very lovely.

Photo #5:  Some of the Children Enjoying Fat Tuesday

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They were singing songs and dancing.

See you in Lent!

 

 

 

*Naturally we took them to the Shrine.  Have you been there yet?

 

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I Picked Up a Hitchhiker

I really did it.  I picked up a hitchhiker for the first time the other day, with a van full of kids no less.  This was back in January, when we were living in North Dakota.

Backup a Bit

It was a bitterly cold Thursday afternoon, and the children and I were driving into town to attend the funeral of a friend.  It was one of the coldest days of the season with the wind whipping the snow around and dropping the temperature to about -30 degrees Fahrenheit.  We were still a few miles from town when I came up over a hill and spotted a man walking alongside the road.  His whole body was bent over, as he was trudging against the fierce wind.

Immediately my heart leapt, and I knew I had to offer him a ride; he’d die otherwise.  So, I yelled back to the kids that I was going to offer this man a ride, and that I’d explain my actions later.

I slowed down, breathed a prayer of protection to my guardian angel, and rolled down the window and shouted, “Hey!  You want a ride?”

A young face turned to me and halfheartedly waved.  He hadn’t heard me because of the wind.

I boldly tried again, “Get in!”

Then he understood and nodded.  He ran over and pointed to the back of the van, wondering if he ought to ride in the back?

I shook my head.  “No, sit up here, by me.”  I was going to keep my eye on this guy, after all.

He opened the door and quickly jumped in and shuddered.  Again, it was a deadly cold day.  As I picked up speed, he quietly said, “Thank you.  It’s a lot longer walk into town than I remembered.”

Dear Reader, let me tell you now, he reeked of alcohol, and my heart ached for him.  Why was he out walking on such a savagely cold afternoon?  I wanted to ask him this, but didn’t.  Instead, I told him I was driving to the Cathedral and that I’d drop him off anywhere he wanted along the way.  And again, all he said was, “Thank you.”

As I neared town, he mentioned that he’d get out at the Interstate exit.  During this time, I was asking for the guidance of Jesus.  Is there anything, dear Jesus, that you would have me say to this young man?

“I am Catholic,” I blurted out, as I pulled over at the exit.  “Please, you must take this holy card of Jesus.  He loves you so.  And here is His Mother, Mary.  She loves you too.”

There was a pause as he reached for the holy card of Jesus and the Miraculous Medal of Mary.  He looked them.

I continued, “She cares about you, you know.  He does too.”

He looked at me and said, “Thank you.”  Then he opened the door and was gone into the vicious wind.

I turned onto the Interstate and glanced at the silent children in the rearview mirror and paused.  How do I explain myself?  This was certainly something I had never done before, nor would I recommend it.

I began, “Don’t you ever, ever do that–pick up strangers, I mean.”  Then I sighed and continued, “Well, unless the Holy Spirit or your Guardian Angel tells you to do so.  Then you listen and do as your told.”

Pause.  “That’s why I picked that man up.  I was told to.  But that almost never happens.”

More silence.  “We must pray for this young man, children.”

And so we did.  Perhaps you could offer a small prayer for him too, Dear Readers?

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Septuagesima Sunday is Coming

This Sunday is Septuagesima Sunday–in the Old Calendar.  Kind of a funny name, no?  It means that we’re on the threshold of Lent.  Are you ready?

Septuagesima, Sexagesima, & Quinquagesima Sundays

In the Old Calendar, the three Sundays prior to Ash Wednesday were specifically dedicated to preparing one for Lent, and they have funny, Latin names: Septuagesima, Sexagesima, and Quinquagesima.  They mean, seventieth, sixtieth, and fiftieth, which is to say, it’s roughly 70 days until Easter, 60 days until Easter, and fifty days until Easter.  This next Sunday, we’ll be at Septuagesima.

Well, in the Old Calendar during the three weeks prior to the actual start of Lent, priests wore violet vestments and certain elements of the Mass were dropped, like the Gloria and Alleluia.  (In fact, there’s a sweet tradition of physically burying the Alleluia, only to dig it up again at Easter.)  All of these things were meant to get you thinking.  Sober up, people!  Let’s start preparing.

The 3 Pillars of Lent: Prayer, Fasting, & Almsgiving

During these fore-lenten Sundays, my husband and I like to begin preparing for Lent.  We take a look at the classic 3 pillars of lent: prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.  Below I’ll offer a few thoughts for you all to consider.

Prayer:

  1. Do you set aside a time to pray, every single day?  If not, what’s stopping you?
  2. For those of you who are married, are you praying with your spouse?  Every day?
  3. Or how about praying Compline in the evenings?
  4. For those of you with children, are you praying with them every day?
  5. How about a family rosary?
  6. Fathers, are you blessing your children every day?
  7. And finally, go to confession!  At bare, rock-bottom minimum, go at least once this season.  If you’d like a challenge, consider going every other week or so.
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Again, go to confession!  You won’t regret it.

Fasting:

Fasting is the second great pillar of Lent.  In our culture, this one gets ignored a lot.  And we need it.  I’m reminded of Jesus’ words in Mark 9:28-29, “And when he had entered the house, his disciples asked him privately, “Why could we not cast [the demon] out?”  And he said to them, “This kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer and fasting.”

Do you have something in your life that needs casting out?  Try fasting.  Do you know of someone who really needs Jesus?  Try fasting.

If you’ve never done this before, start small.  Give up one meal a week.  If you’re accustomed to weekly fasting, try two days a week.

Almsgiving:

This one’s a little tricky, as every family is in a different place financially.  If you’d like a little more on what the Church officially says, click HERE for Jimmy Akin’s take on tithing and giving.

The point during Lent is to work towards the virtue of generosity – the virtue of being unattached to material goods and in gift giving.  During Lent, one may look at it in two ways:

  1. How can our family work towards giving more of our total income?
  2. In what ways am I able to make a monetary sacrifice during Lent to benefit a charity?

The first one…again, as each family is different, this one cannot have some uniform answer.  Wherever you’re at on this one, take a step towards giving more of your total income.  If you’re currently giving 1%, try 2%.  For those of you who’d like a stricter guideline, I once read somewhere to shoot for 5% of your income to your local church, 4% to any charity, and 1% to the Bishop.  This would be a true 10% tithe.  (The word tithe means one tenth.)

If you really want a challenge, and are already tithing 10% of your income, then consider giving 10% of your total income before taxes.  And tithe that bonus too.

The second point…during Lent make an additional monetary sacrifice.  For example, maybe you are accustomed to dining out a few times each month.  Consider not eating out, and expressly give that budgeted money away to your favorite charity.

In the end, God cannot be outdone in generosity, and He will reward you!  Just take the first step.

And Lastly, a Lenten Challenge

Have you ever wondered what it was like for most Catholics throughout the history of our Church to pray the Mass?  I mean, what was it like for St. Catherine of Siena to receive the Eucharist?    Or which Mass inspired the great writings of St. Thomas Aquinas?  Or the great missionaries?

For nearly 2000 years Catholics have been worshipping the same way at the Latin Mass, and if you’ve got one near you, check it out.  Don’t worry about not understanding everything.  Most places have hand missals, if you’d like to follow along.  (But you don’t have to.)

If you live around here, we’ve a few options.  Try the Shrine to Our Lady of Guadalupe at 9:30am.  Or St. James the Less parish at 11am.  We’ll be there.

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The Non-Contemplative Rosary

Look, I’ve got 7 children, and I get asked from time-to-time, “Oh, my, how do you survive that?”  I am usually assaulted with this question while buying groceries or purchasing strong coffee or standing in line at the DMV or getting my haircut.  You know, the usual places, and my answer varies according to the asker and the situation.  For posterity, I’ll offer a few of my varied responses below.

Question:  Are all those children yours?!

Answer:  Yes.

Question:  Haven’t you figured out how that happens yet?  (Wink, wink.)

Answer:  Yes, and it’s enjoyable.  (Wink!)

Exclamation:  Wow!  Your hands are full.

Response:  Yes, and I wouldn’t have it any other way!

Question:  Seriously, how do you survive that?

Answer:  That’s why I’m here buying strong coffee.

But really, that last answer isn’t the full truth.  We survive–and I flatter myself it’s more like “thrive”–because we pray a family rosary every. single. day.  Most of the time we pray it in the evening, after supper chores, but sometimes it has to be in the van, if we’re busy.

Our family rosary, however, is the most non-contemplative rosary that I pray.  I mean, I have 7 children and most of them can hardly sit still, let alone kneel.  And we moved to kneeling awhile back.

Actually, kneeling is more helpful because then no one needs to be touching another person, whereas on the couch, someone is always poking or punching their neighbor.  Lest you be deceived, however, kneeling doesn’t solve all problems.  You’d be surprised at how one brother can sock another brother as quick as lightening and look as innocent as a dove.

And those are just the brothers.  There’s also the little girls.  While the 6-year-old does kneel, she has a giggling problem.  Everything is just so funny and entertaining!  Which is true, because the 3-year-old is always sneaking out of her spot and gathering things–tissues, dolls, random hair binders left on the floor…  Then she distributes them, which provokes the 1-year-old to follow suit.  Not kidding.  It’s a regular circus at times.  In fact, here’s a picture from last night:

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Yes, that’s tissue on her head.

You’ll notice in the above photo that all the girls are sporting lovely hair clips.  That’s because “The Baby” wandered around during the rosary and adorned everyone’s hair.  Was this distracting?  Yes.  But someone forgot to shut the bathroom door, wherein all hair clips are located, and she meandered over there and came back with a skirt full.

Now, my husband had a choice at this point.  He could have stopped all rosary-praying and collected all hair pieces amidst loud protesting cries, or he could allow the rosary to continue with only occasional giggles from the girls.

And giggling won.  Last night anyway.  And the following were my meditations during this fiasco:

1st mystery: Spare us, O Lord
2nd mystery: Graciously hear us, O Lord
3rd mystery: Lord, have mercy on us
4th mystery: Lead me not into temptation
5th mystery: Deliver me from evil, O Lord

You might be wondering if it’s worth it?

I mean, “praying” the rosary every night?  Yes.  Yes, it is.  It’s the most beautiful thing we do together as a family.  And while we’re working on maintaining prayerful postures and and meaningful meditations, our heavenly Mother is interceding for our souls.

Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us!

P.S.  I know I said I probably wouldn’t be writing a post for a few weeks, due to the move, but I guess this one just spilled out and wrote itself.  Actually, I didn’t feel like packing…  But now, for real, I probably won’t write another post for a few weeks.

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Cardinal Burke Holds Nothing Back

Last weekend my husband and I flew out to La Crosse to buy a house.  His Eminence the Most Reverend Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke just happened to be there too.  He was celebrating a Pontifical Mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe.  As neither of us had ever attended a Solemn Pontifical Mass, we hiked up that hill with glee and anticipation.

We were not disappointed.

Thankfully we were about an hour and half early, as it was a packed house.  There were men in suits, women in veils, babies in slings, and young people everywhere.  The Choir from St. Mary’s Oratory in Wausau was practicing Anton Bruckner’s Ave Maria, and I was overcome with emotion.  By the time the men sang the third Jesu, I had goosebumps from my head to my foot.  After being starved for liturgical beauty nearly all my life, I could no longer check my tears.  Here, here was the way one ought to experience the Mass!

Dear Readers, if you ever have an opportunity to attend such a Mass, jump at it!

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Here is Cardinal Burke as he processed in, giving blessings.  (Sorry about the bad photo.)

In any case, Cardinal Burke didn’t hold anything back in his homily either.  He used such terms as “Brood of Vipers” and “Accursed” to describe those in the Church who are allowing such evils to happen as pachamama worship and widespread doctrinal confusion.  He was quiet, solemn, and clear.  And I wanted to stand up and cheer.

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Here he is, formally vesting for Mass.  Look to the left for the red hat.

May God bless Cardinal Burke!

And just for fun…

Here are the children, busy at work two days ago.  They built the biggest snow fort I’ve ever been in.  Gotta love Christmas break.

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Go To Confession! And the O Antiphons

Today, December 17th, begins the greater days of Advent, as we solemnly walk towards Christmas Day.  In the Divine Office one can find and pray the beautiful “O Antiphons.” Most of us are familiar with these verses, as they make up the lyrics for the hymn O Come, O Come Emmanuel.

December 17th is:

O Wisdom, Which camest out of the mouth of the Most High reaching from end to end and ordering all things mightily and sweetly: come and teach us the way of prudence.

And lastly, I want to encourage you to go to Confession.  Below you’ll find an old post of mine from a year and a half ago.  It still tears at my heart when I read it.

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We All Need Confession

I had one of those terrible moments the other night.  You know, the ones where you crush the spirit of your child and know it.  It’s awful.

I had just sat down with my husband to pray Night Prayer after a long, harrowing day.  I was exhausted from the previous night’s insomnia, stressed about our house not selling, and anxious about the up-coming school year.  All I wanted to do was pray (i.e. whine about my problems to Jesus) without interruptions from my children.

Alas, this was not meant to be.  We hadn’t even made it through the opening prayer and up bounces one boy yelling, “Mom, he wrecked my lego set!”  And then 30 seconds later, the 5-year-old runs up crying, “Mom, she pushed me right here.  It really hurts.  I don’t understand why she has to do that.  I was just trying to brush her hair…”

Now, I made it through these interruptions without losing it, but barely.  Then up walks my eldest and asks with a merry twinkle in her eye, “Mom and Dad?  Will you come downstairs?  We have a surprise for you!”  I turned toward her, looked her straight in the eye, and firmly said, “No.”  She was immediately taken aback.  She slowly turned around, her shoulders slumped, and I could hear a sigh of true disappointment.  I had really hurt her.  She was so excited to show us something, and I had resolutely pushed her aside.

I had a choice in that moment.  I could persevere in my obstinate insistence on my will to avoid the children, or I could humble myself before Jesus, admit my wrong behavior, and agree to go see the “surprise.”  I could feel my husband silently pleading with me with his eyes, and so I called after her, “Wait!  We’ll come down after prayer to see your surprise.”

It was the right choice, even though I had to sacrifice my ideal of a quiet night.  The children had made up a little play for us, and it was beautiful.  They had made a special spot for us to sit and commenced singing and dancing in costume.  And I could have missed it all!  I wouldn’t trade those fifteen minutes for anything.

And now, there’s one thing left for me to do.  Go to Confession.  We all need to go regularly, and so this is my friendly reminder to all of you too:

Go to Confession!

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Our Trip and a Few Advent Ideas

We are finally back from our tri-state tour.  It began with some medical appointments in Rochester, MN.  Although Paul is experiencing daily headaches, these are very minor, compared to what he went through earlier this year.  He is, in fact, doing well.  His doctors are pleased, and so are we.

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Paul, during an EEG, wherein doctors look for potential seizure activity.  (They found none.)

After Paul’s medical appointments, we traveled to La Crosse, Wisconsin, and visited the Shrine of Our Lady of Guadalupe again.  (See HERE for our first trip.)  Our family has a particular devotion to her.  Her feast day, by the way, is coming up on December 12th.

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Here are the children outside the main church.

And here’s the interior:

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The lovely thing about the Shrine is that they celebrate the TLM every Sunday.

This time we were able to explore the outdoor Way of the Cross and the Rosary Walk.  These are paved trails dotted with reflections and benches.

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This is the entrance to the Way of the Cross.

And because she’s so cute, here’s Child #6 up close:

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Her shoes are on the wrong feet.  It’s amazing how that always happens.  (And doesn’t seem to bother her.)

After the Shrine, we checked out St. James the Less Catholic Church, also in La Crosse.

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This is a stunning church.  And hey!  Look, no table altar.

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Now that is how one builds an altar.

This parish offers both the Novus Ordo and the Traditional Latin Mass.  Both are obviously celebrated Ad Orientem, as again, there’s no table altar.

Here’s a look at the ambo.

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That is a statue of St. Michael the Archangel next to it.

I could only dream of worshiping at a church like this.  I hope the parishioners of St. James know what a treasure they have!

After Wisconsin, we traveled to South Dakota and celebrated Thanksgiving with my extended family.  We had about 51 people gathered together at my sister’s house.  My aunt, Karen, led us in prayer, we sang America the Beautiful, and we ate and visited and laughed.  I am so thankful for my family!

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Here we all are, Thanksgiving Day morning

Anyone Need Advent Ideas?

And lastly, if anyone is in need of Advent ideas, I strongly recommend Dr. Taylor Marshall’s Advent video, which is mostly directly towards men and fathers of families.  In this short, 15-minute video, he offers 5 challenges for Advent:

  1. Attend the TLM 4 times during Advent.
  2. Read all of 2 Maccabees.
  3. Pray the rosary every day.
  4. Fast 2 days of the week.
  5. And celebrate the Feast of the Immaculate Conception as you would Thanksgiving.

Click HERE for it.  Seriously, he’s right.  These are great ideas for Advent and worthwhile trying to do, if you don’t already do them.  Our family has never done #5, and we’re going to try to step it up this year.

And if that isn’t enough, watch his video on Advent traditions that he does with his family.  This video is interesting because his wife, Joy, joins him.  Click HERE for that video and enjoy!

 

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Bishop Athanasius Schneider is a Hero

I just want to briefly point out that Bishop Athanasius Schneider has publicly and forcefully condemned the use of the pagan idol “Pachamama.”  Schneider is calling on all bishops and priests around the world to also condemn these demonic statues.

Praise God for Bishop Schneider speaking up.  May all the angels protect him, for he will be persecuted.

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I wish I had a better picture of Bishop Schneider, but this free one from Wikimedia Commons will have to do.

Read Bishop Schneider’s whole public statement HERE at LifeSite News. Read it to your families.  This is a bigger issue than you think.

I’ll leave you with a few of Schneider’s remarks.  Note his very last line.  (All items in bold, color, or italicized are mine.)

“As a successor to the Apostles, entrusted with care for God’s flock, I cannot remain silent in the face of the blatant violation of God’s holy will and the disastrous consequences it will have upon individual souls, the Church as a whole, and indeed the entire human race. It is therefore with great love for the souls of my brothers and sisters that I write this message.”

All true Catholics, who still have the spirit of the Apostles and of the Christian martyrs, should weep and say about the pagan ceremonies which took place in the Eternal City of Rome, paraphrasing the words of Psalm 79:1: “O God, the heathen have come into thine inheritance; thy holy city of Rome have they defiled; they have laid Rome in ruins.””

“Amid the consternation and shock over the abomination perpetrated by the syncretistic religious acts in the Vatican, the entire Church and the world has witnessed a highly meritorious, courageous and praiseworthy act of some brave Christian gentlemen, who on October 21 expelled the wooden idolatrous statues from the Church of Santa Maria in Traspontina in Rome, and threw them into the Tiber. Like a new “Maccabees” they acted in the spirit of the holy wrath of Our Lord, who expelled the merchants from the temple of Jerusalem with a whip. The gestures of these Christian men will be recorded in the annals of Church history as a heroic act which brought glory to the Christian name, while the acts of high-ranking churchmen, on the contrary, who defiled the Christian name in Rome, will go down in history as cowardly and treacherous acts of ambiguity and syncretism.”

“In view of the requirements of the authentic worship and adoration of the One True God, the Most Blessed Trinity, and Christ Our Savior, in virtue of my ordination as a Catholic bishop and successor to the Apostles, and in true fidelity and love for the Roman Pontiff, the Successor of Peter, and for his task to preside over the “Cathedra of the truth” (cathedra veritatis), I condemn the veneration of the pagan symbol of Pachamama in the Vatican Garden, in St. Peter’s basilica, and in the Roman church of Santa Maria in Traspontina.”

“It would be good for all true Catholics, first and foremost bishops and then also priests and lay faithful, to form a worldwide chain of prayers and acts of reparation for the abomination of the veneration of wooden idols perpetrated in Rome during the Amazon Synod. Faced with such an evident scandal, it is impossible that a Catholic bishop would remain silent, it would be unworthy of a successor of the Apostles. The first in the Church who should condemn such acts and do reparation is Pope Francis.”

Did you catch that?

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Following the Fate of Pachamama?

If any of you are following the Amazon Synod, you may be curious to know that a somewhat hopeful event just happened in Rome.

A few men, finally fed up with Amazonian pagan idols on display in their church, did something.  They walked in, genuflected, collected those pagan fertility goddesses representing “Mother Earth,” and walked out.  They strolled over to the Tiber River and flung them in.  One by one.

The video is HERE.  We showed it to our whole family, toddlers and all.  That is how one deals with naked and offensive idols.

Then we prayed a rosary for these men, who will no doubt be persecuted.

I can’t help but be reminded of St. Boniface chopping down the sacred oak trees in Germany, long centuries past.  St. Boniface, pray for us!

If you’re not familiar with what’s going on, you might consider watching Dr. Taylor Marshall and Timothy Gordon explaining this “Pachamama” phenomenon HERE.  It’s excellent.

For those of you who might want more, HERE is Michal Voris from Church Militant.  (This video is only a few minutes long.)  He’s got the official response from the Vatican, which speaks volumes.  Unbelievable.  One wonders if they’ve read the Book of Kings.

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Mitres, Crosiers, & the Eucharist

The other day Bishop Kagan celebrated Mass for our local homeschool group to signal the beginning of another academic year.  We were very grateful to him for this.

Two of my sons served this Mass.  (Paul, of course, could not, as he was still in the hospital.)  Their particular roles during the Mass were to take care of the Bishop’s mitre and crosier.  Each son wore a special cope draped over his shoulders, which he used to cover his hands, so as to never touch either object.  For only the bishop may touch these holy items.

It was impressive to watch this interplay of giving and receiving.  One instinctively knew that something special was being given and received each time, by nature of that cope.  It was out of the ordinary and beautiful.  I wish I had a picture of it.

Kagan’s homily was beautiful too, even though it appeared to have nothing to do with the Mass readings.  Rather, it was all about the Real Presence in the Eucharist.  At the time I wondered if he was reflecting on the recent Pew Research Poll showing that 69% of Catholics don’t believe in the Real Presence.  In other words, the majority of Catholics believe the Eucharist to be only a symbol, which is nothing short of a tragedy.

My Husband is Spot On

I called my husband that night (he was still in the hospital with Paul) and told him about the Mass, about Kagan’s homily, about the boys serving, and finally about the special treatment of the mitre and the crosier.

My husband was quiet a moment and then said, “It is beautiful how carefully and respectfully the bishop’s mitre and crosier were handled.  You know, we used to treat the Eucharist this way too.  No one touched Him with his hands.  Rather, we knelt at an altar rail, and we received Him on our tongues.”

My husband sighed and went on, “I wonder if there would be more belief in the Real Presence if our actions showed what our hearts believed?”

“You mean,” I said, “if churches were to bring back altar rails and patens and if we all knelt once again?  You think it would help Catholics believe in Jesus’ Real Presence?”

“Yes.”

Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi

This got me thinking.  Of course our actions and our postures matter.  There is a little phrase that one comes by, “Lex orandi, lex credendi.”  It means that how you pray will affect how you believe.  For our actions and postures aid our faith and belief.