Book Review

Holocaust Memoirs: Book Review

I recently finished reading Rena’s Promise: A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz.  It’s the real-life story of Rena Kornreich and how she survived 3 years living the Auschwitz Death Camps.  It’s gruesome, shocking, and sad.

It should be required reading for anyone mature enough to handle it.  (Maybe as young as 17.)

In the last year or so, this is the third book that I’ve read pertaining to survivors of World War II.  All three books are worthy of your consideration and your library shelf.  I’ll list them below:

  1. Rena’s Promise: A Story of Sisters in Auschwitz by Rena Kornreich
  2. The Nazi Officer’s Wife by Edith Hahn Beer
  3. The Hiding Place by Corrie Ten Boom

I’ll also mention that all 3 books are very complimentary.  Rena’s Promise chronicles the life of a young Jewish woman, bereft of faith, but suffering tremendously for it.  She certainly lived an active Jewish life prior to the war, living with her family, but at the death camps, and without blatantly stating it, she loses her faith.

In fact, one wonders if hate hasn’t crept into her heart as she participates in the beating of a superior.  Throughout her time in Auschwitz/Birkenau, she wonders, “Where did God go?”  She’s grappling with the question of a good God allowing evil.  And she has no answer.  She can only rely upon herself to survive, which she does against all odds.

It’s truly miraculous how she and her sister survive such torture.  (Note that I used the word “miraculous.”  She wouldn’t use that word.)

The second book on the list is one that I previously reviewed for these pages last year.  (Click HERE for it.)

The Nazi Officer’s Wife is also the story of how a young Jewish woman, Edith Hahn, survives the war, but her story is dramatically different than Rena’s.  Hahn does end up in labor camps, but then is able to hide and take on the identity of a gentile, thus avoiding the death camps.  Eventually she marries a German officer.

This book is so valuable for not only her personal story, but for a close look at the German Thing from the inside.  It’s so eerily close to what’s happening in our culture that it makes your skin crawl.

Since I am always interested in the question of Faith, I can’t help but compare Rena’s story to Edith’s.  Even though Edith does not practice her Jewish faith, she has more hope.  She notices something is missing.  Rena’s is much darker by contrast.

Lastly, I read a book called The Hiding Place a few months ago.

While I’d rate the previous two books as a 10, this book gets a 10+.

At the outset of World War II, Corrie Ten Boom was a middle-aged spinster, helping her father fix and sell watches in Holland.  They were devout Christians who helped Jews hide and escape, but the Ten Booms were eventually discovered by the Germans.  This book tells about the horrific (and heroic) suffering of Corrie, but more importantly, it shows her immense love of God in a dark, dark place.

This is the stuff of saints.  You need to read it.  In fact, you should read all 3.  Why?  Because if we don’t get it, then history will repeat itself.  This evil and tragic event has eternal consequences.  We cannot in fact understand who we are today, without understanding that horrible war–it’s beginnings and aftermath.  We are still suffering the consequences of those driving ideologies.

Final Question

Has anyone read any other good, first-hand accounts of Holocaust survivors?  I’m especially interested in the men.  What was their experience?

If you’ve read any, drop a line in the comments box.

Of course I have read Fr. Goldmann’s account of his miraculous survival in his book The Shadow of His Wings.  Truly, that book is one of the best books ever written, and by a Catholic priest serving in the SS no less!  I’d review it, but it’s been years since I’ve read it.  Probably many of you are already familiar with it?

 

Motherhood & Parenting

Paul’s Surgery is Done

For those of you who are following Paul’s plight, here’s an update.

IMG_1326.jpg

On Monday we began the long trek back to Rochester for a second surgery, which lasted about 3 hours.  His doctor reopened his incisions from 7 years ago and made a thorough examination of his old shunt system, beginning with the shunt itself, down to the valve behind his ear, and finally snaking all the way down his neck into his stomach cavity.

The doctor was hoping that he’d discover that it was malfunctioning, which would be an easy explanation for the incredibly high levels of pressure in Paul’s brain during his migraines.  But he did not.  The old shunt was functioning.  Nevertheless, he replaced it with all newer equipment, in hopes that even though the old equipment was functioning, perhaps it wasn’t functioning optimally.

IMG_1325.jpg
Here’s a closer shot of two of his incisions.  There’s a third on his stomach, where the tubing ends.

And how was Paul during this four day trial?  Physically he was as well as could be expected, but emotionally and psychologically, he was down.  Very down.  As a mother, this was the hardest thing to watch.  He didn’t want to be in a hospital anymore.  He didn’t want to have wires and tubes sticking out of him.  He didn’t want to wear a hospital gown.  But he didn’t cry about it; he just looked terribly sad.

So we prayed through it.  This time he chose to offer his sufferings for our family.  We prayed rosaries.  We prayed morning and night prayer.  But really, I think he was just exhausted, as we all were.

Finally the day after his surgery in the afternoon, he picked up a little, as the beautiful water fountain out of his window was turned on that day, and he could watch it from his window.

IMG_1330.jpg
When he could move around, he sat up in the window and watched the courtyard fill with people enjoying the fountain and warm weather.

My mom and I also walked him down the hall to a pottery class for the children on his floor.  He didn’t want to walk out there in his hospital gown, dragging an IV cart along, but he did.

IMG_1331.jpg
Here he is, painting a mug.  The local company that sponsored this activity will fire it and mail it to him.

We also found other things to distract him with.  We watched the Twins play baseball.  (Paul’s a big fan of Rosario, and it was neat to see him hit a few home runs.)  My mom bought a lego set, which he put together, took apart, put together…  We read a few light books, you know, like Frog and Toad.

In the end, it is our hope that this new shunt will somehow alleviate his migraines, and they will disappear.  High levels of pressure in one’s brain is a very serious thing.  Children with hydrocephalus die or go into a coma with the same levels that Paul was experiencing–levels into the 40s and 50s.  But because his levels are cyclic, however, he manages to be ok, and has not had any damage to his brain, yet.

Paul’s doctor has said that if this shunt doesn’t work, then we’ll have to think about another surgery wherein he’ll take apart his cranium and reassemble it with a plastic surgeon to allow for more space, in an attempt to alleviate those pressure levels.

Lastly, a Thank You

Truly, my husband and I are very thankful for the great help of the staff, doctors, and nurses at St. Mary’s Hospital in Rochester.  They’ve all been so helpful and kind.

We’re also greatly indebted to our parents who have done so many things for us over these last four weeks–watching children, cooking meals, paying for hotels and gas and food, allowing us to use their reliable car, and indeed accompanying us on these many trips.  How could we do it without you?  We couldn’t.  May God bless you for your generosity and love.  We love you all so much.

Lastly, we want to thank everyone who has prayed with us during this difficult trial.  As prayers and sacrifices are hidden things, and we may never know about them, we pray that God, who is a great Father, will reward you all abundantly.

IMG_1334.jpg
Here he is on the way home.  The doctors gave him some gear to show his siblings.  He’s also sporting his new Twins Rosario t-shirt.  Thank you, Mom!
Motherhood & Parenting

5 Reasons Why I Love My Mom: Post Revisited

Awhile back in January, I wrote the following post in honor of my mom.  Today I am highlighting it, in honor of Mother’s Day.

Happy Mother’s Day, Mom!*

IMG_0854.jpg
This is my mom and me.

5 Reasons Why I Love My Mom

  1. She doesn’t mind that I call her obnoxiously, like every other day.  I’m a natural chatterbox and like to talk.  Who better to call?
  2. When she visits, she likes hanging out with me.  I mean, she’ll actually ditch the grandkids and willing do something with just me.  She’ll even go to a coffee shop, even though she–gasp–hates coffee!
  3. She’s sacrificial.  Like I just said.  Furthermore, even though she despises onions–horror of horrors!–she’ll feign to eat them for my sake, for I can’t live without them and put them into practically everything.  She just smiles and nibbles away at them.
  4. She also hates running, but guess what?  She’s ran a few road races with me.  And one time, we even convinced my sister to run one too.  But that was awful because she complained the whole time that she was going to die, which she obviously didn’t.  (Speaking of, want to do another one, Mom?)
  5. Did I mention that she’s seriously sacrificial?  When she visits, if my dishes need washing, she’ll wash them.  If my cupboards need cleaning, she’ll clean them.  If my toilet needs scrubbing, she’ll scrub it.

I’ve got a lot to learn from my mother.

Thank you, Mom!  I love you!

Final Note

Today, since it’s January 22 and the anniversary of that horrible Supreme Court decision to allow for abortion in this country, and since you’re obviously alive and reading this, give your mother a call and thank her for giving birth to you.  (Especially if you were born after 1973, the year that satanic law went into place.)

Secondly, pray for an end to the Scourge of Abortion.  Do an act of penance.  Today our family will be eating plain bread for breakfast.

*The funny thing is, she doesn’t read my blog!  Technology is not her thing, nor mine either for that matter.  So, I’ll have to send the link to her phone, or have my husband do it…
Motherhood & Parenting

The Plan For Paul

For those of you interested in my son, Paul, here is another update.

Last night he finally slept, and as you can see from the photo below, he woke up with a little more pizzazz.

thumbnail_IMG_1312.jpg
Here he is, feeling better.  

As an aside, the other day, when the nurses wheeled him in for surgery prep, one of the nurses asked him, “Do you know any jokes?”

With a twinkle in his eye, Paul politely answered, “Yes,” and calmly asked, “Have you seen the new movie called Constipation yet?”

“Nope.  Never heard of it.”

“Well, that’s because it hasn’t come out yet.”

And that, my dear readers, is my son’s favorite joke.

The Plan, In Short

After two days of monitoring the pressure in his brain, his doctors have determined that his existing shunt is malfunctioning and possibly sucking in bits of his brain.  So next Tuesday, Paul will have another surgery to remove the existing shunt and to place a new one in.

One more week of this!  Oh, please pray for me too!

And a Thank You

Lastly, we want to thank Fr. Kasel from the archdiocese of Minneapolis and St. Paul for traveling to Rochester to anoint Paul.  Truly, we are very grateful.  He not only anointed him, but prayed with him, heard his confession and played cards with him.

May God bless you,  Fr. Kasel!

thumbnail_IMG_0417.jpg
Paul, my husband, Shawn, and Fr. Kasel
Motherhood & Parenting

Update on My Son, Paul

Dear Readers,

I write this morning asking for prayers.  Our son, Paul, is currently in Rochester, MN, being monitored at the hospital in the ICU.

My husband and father-in-law drove down a few days ago for an Intracranial Pressure Monitor to be placed under his skull.  This device monitors the pressure in his brain to determine if there’s too much.  For example, the doctor explained, when you have a bowel movement, the pressure levels in your brain reach 30, but only briefly.  Normally the levels of pressure in your brain do not exceed 20 mmHg.

One cannot sustain high levels of pressure for extended periods of time without eventually doing great damage to the brain.  In fact, one of the first things to go are the eyes.  Blindness will result from high, extended levels of pressure.

thumbnail_IMG_1309.jpg
Paul, after surgery yesterday with the Intracranial Pressure Monitor

In any case, Paul’s doctors are concerned that his existing shunt, which was placed in 2012 to drain an arachnoid cyst, might be causing problems.  The only way to determine if this is the case, is to monitor it.

Immediately upon placing the monitor on his brain, the doctors immediately noticed elevated levels of pressure of around 40.  Obviously, this is not good.  After a few hours, however, it did go down, when Paul’s migraine went away.

Last night, though, was a rough night.  Paul had another migraine and spend the night intermittently vomiting.  The pressure levels in his brain reached into the 50s and did not return to normal until around 6am.

Later today, we should know more information, as to what the doctor wants to do.  He’s only seen a handful of these cases – children with existing shunts experiencing dreadful migraines.  We are praying that the angels will guide the doctors into making the right decisions.

Please, remember Paul and his doctors in your prayers today.

Christ-Like Minimalism

Christ-like Minimalism: The Bathroom

Bathrooms may be the easiest room to simplify.  What does one really need?

  1. Toilet Paper
  2. A Towel
  3. Soap
  4. Toothbrush & Toothpaste
IMG_1156.jpg
My bathroom

Oh, but the reality is, I’ve got more in mine.

I have a hair dryer, flat iron, and hair spray.  I also have mascara and a cosmetic compact, with two different colors of lipstick.  I’ve got 4 bottles of lotion.  (Mea culpa.)  My husband has shaving cream, deodorant, and a set of hair clippers.  He also keeps a Bible and Euclid’s Elements “on his side.”  (I suppose because it’s the only place where he can read uninterrupted??)

There are other things too.  I’ve got a household of 9 people to keep track of.  Therefore, I tend to buy things in bulk.  I’ve got three bottles of contact solution.  And a ton of toilet paper below the sink.

IMG_1296.jpg
Here’s an inside shot of the upper cabinet.
IMG_1295.jpg
And here’s the lower part of the cabinet with medicine on top and my things below.

In any case, someday I hope to have less.  But for now, here’s what I can recommend.

Tips for Less in the Bathroom:

  1. Limit the number of bottles in your shower.  I’ve got 3: my shampoo, body wash, and my husband’s shampoo.  Really, we could get by with 1.
  2. Limit the number of towels and washcloths in your cabinet.  The children have 1 towel each in their bathrooms, and my husband and I each have 2.
  3. Throw that old medicine away.  If you haven’t used it in a year, it’s probably bad anyway.
  4. Throw those old cosmetics away and buy less!

The last thing I’ll recommend for your bathroom is a holy picture or crucifix.  I have St. Therese right my by sink, and sometimes, when I’m brushing my teeth or doing whatever, I talk to her.  Yes, I might be a little crazy, but she always listens.

What’s by your sink?

IMG_1293.jpg

Life is Worth Living

May Day Baskets, Wine, & Guns N Roses: May Favorites

Welcome to the month of May!  And to celebrate, I’ll offer a few of my favorite things.

My May Favorites:

  1. Every year I forget about May Day and May Day baskets, but my children don’t.  They gave my husband some of their own money and directed him to buy a particular chocolate turtle, found at a local chocolate shop, knowing it’s my favorite.  Then they wove a basket from construction paper and lined it with drawings and notes.

    That night, while my husband and I were enjoying a Brandy Alexander, and I was losing at Gin Rummy, they snuck out of their window, ran to the front door, rang the bell, ran back laughing, and I had a May Day basket waiting on the front steps.

IMG_1287.jpg
Here it is.  Except the chocolate is gone; I ate it.

2.  I love drinking wine.  And lately, I’ve been enjoying a wine named Josh.  Their merlot is fabulous, especially when I can get it on sale.  I think it runs around $16 normally, but I found it for about $11.

IMG_1290.jpg
Here it is, empty.  We drank it all.

3.  Speaking of wine, I also enjoy drinking Dreaming Tree, but when I crack that bottle open, my husband just rolls his eyes and barely deigns to drink it.  For you see, this wine is a collaboration of Dave Matthews and Sean McKenzie.  Dave Matthews is, of course, the famous lead singer of the Dave Matthews Band, and my husband can hardly tolerate him after spending his college years being forced to listen “to that sappy crap” all day long from his obsessed roommate.

Me?  I only ever listened to his song “Crash Into Me.”  While it’s not highly offensive, I don’t recommend it.  But I do recommend the wine.

IMG_1291 2.jpg
This bottle is usually around $16, but I found it at Sam’s Club for $12.88.

 

 

4.  The other day, I got sick of the Magnificat.  I had been using it to read the Mass readings to the children every morning, but I wanted something more beautiful.   I wanted the Old Mass readings and prayers.  So I grabbed my 1962 Missal and haven’t gone back.  Wow, are these prayers beautiful.

So, the 1962 Missal is one of my May Favorites.  In fact, when I’m forced to attend the Novus Ordo, I just bring it along and pray the the TLM prayers instead.

5.  Since we cancelled our Magnificat subscription, we had funds available for a different publication.  What do subscribe to?  The Remnant.  Seriously, this newspaper is a hidden gem.  It’s based out of St. Paul, MN, and is pretty traddy.  Some of you may not care for it, but for the rest of you, click HERE for their website.

6.  The other Sunday, as we were sitting through another banal Novus Ordo Mass, complete with horrible music, we were accosted with a particularly bad song called, “Somebody’s Knocking at Your Door.”  (Click HERE for it on YouTube, if you dare.)  Anyway, after Mass my husband hopped in the van with a big smirk on his face, and I asked, “What’s so funny?”

“You know that terrible song about knocking on doors at Mass?”

I groaned, “Yes.”

“Well, all I could think of was the Guns N Roses’ 1990 song, “Knocking on Heaven’s Door.”

Naturally, we pulled that song up on the phone, plugged it into the van, and blasted it for the posterity and education of our children.  Just picture it – a white, 15-passenger van, spilling over with kids with crazy parents, windows down, while THIS graced the streets of Mandan.

In between singing as loudly as I could and laughing uncontrollably, I had to thank God for my insightful husband.  He’s my All-Time May Favorite.

Call Me Catholic, Homeschooling

Homeschooling With the Faith: An Essay by the Eldest

As many of you know, I’ve been gone for the last 7 days, attending medical appointments for our son.  We are still not done with this process, but hopefully soon we’ll have some answers.

So today, I offer a little essay written by the Eldest, our 12-year-old.  The other day she wrote an essay for a competition in our homeschool coop.  She worked very hard on it, so I thought I’d share what she wrote for fun.

IMG_1271.jpg
Here she is, diligently working on her dreaded math.

Without further ado…

Homeschooling With the Faith: An Essay by The Eldest

My family homeschools, so homeschooling is living the Faith every moment of everyday.  The Faith is not a subject to be pulled out and then put away. The Faith penetrates everything we do. Here are three glimpses of how my family tries to walk with Jesus throughout the day.

Our family begins each day with prayer.  At 6:40 a.m. my alarm goes off, and I tiptoe upstairs to our living room.  My parents are already up and they have been praying for a half hour in the light from our gas fireplace and votive candles.  I find a blanket and attempt to start my day with God. Pretty soon my brothers also come straggling upstairs and pack themselves like sardines on the loveseat to read saint books.  After prayer, I go to face the bane of my existence–math.

At supper, my father reads the saint of the day from Father Alban Butlers’ Lives of the Saints or in Lent he reads the Stational Church for the day.  Every night my father makes the sacrifice of watching his family eat their food while he reads and endures interruptions.  My family listens and then we talk about the lessons from the saint’s life. This is part of our instruction in the Faith.

At the end of the day our family comes together for the rosary.  Everyone drops what they are doing and comes running or walking.  All of us take a rosary from the rosary hooks and kneel or sit in front of our picture of Mary.  Well, actually the baby generally tries to eat a rosary, which despite diligent practice has never quite come off perfectly.  After praying the Rosary, my siblings and I go to bed with Dad’s blessing.  And that is the end of our homeschool day!

IMG_1272.jpg
She thought it was too early in the morning to smile, but I got her to!
Call Me Catholic

Happy Easter!

Dear Readers,

Happy Easter!  He is risen, Alleluia!

Here’s a snapshot of us all yesterday, celebrating at my inlaws’.  As we didn’t want to leave anyone out of the photo, we had to get creative.

IMG_1268.jpg
My husband is on the left, with our children behind him.  His parents are in the back row, left, and his grandparents the back row, right.

It’s been a whirlwind of a week, as the baby has been very sick.  A few weeks ago she had an ear infection, but never recovered.  She only got worse – vomiting and diarrhea.  This went on for four weeks, during which she all but quit eating and began losing a dangerous amount of weight.  It was very stressful, to say the least.  At her lowest, she weighted 15 pounds, 4 ounces.  Keep in mind that she’s 14 months old.  (I ran into a friend the other day with her 3-month-old baby, who weighs 18 pounds.  That should give you some context.)

Needless to say, Holy Week was very dark for us.  However, she has snapped out of it and has begun to eat again.  Alleluia, alleluia.

And another update…

We will be traveling to Mayo Hospital in Rochester, MN, to have my son with the migraines thoroughly examined.  These appointments begin on Wednesday with an EEG and continue throughout this week and next week.

We’re hoping to find some answers, as his migraines seem to be getting worse with lots of vomiting and now his body locks up during the intense ones, and he’s not able to move.  He’s also blacked out a few times.

His case is a little complicated too, due to his having an arachnoid cyst on his brain, with a shunt draining into his stomach cavity.  Doctors also recently discovered a minor Chiari I malformation, but it isn’t certain that any of these things are causing the pain.  He could just be an extreme case of childhood migraines.  We’ll see.

As many of you are concerned, I will try to offer updates as we go along.

In any case, remember us in your prayers!

Call Me Catholic

Notre Dame de Paris is Burning

Dear Readers,

I am shocked, horrified, and devastated by the recent news of Notre Dame in Paris burning.  Really, my stomach is sick.

I was there in 2002, studying art history.  At that time, I had fallen away from the Church, but was so attracted by her beauty.  I couldn’t get enough.  Notre Dame was simply breathtakingly beautiful.  Just what would inspire a people to build such a thing?

Earlier today I dug an old photo out of me standing in front of Notre Dame’s westwork.  I was taking notes, as my art history professor explained Gothic architecture to us.

Scan.jpg
I am on the left.

What a tragedy.

My first thoughts were exactly those of Steve Skojec from One Peter Five.  If you’re interested click HERE for it.

May our Lady intercede for France!  Holy Mary, pray for us!

Life is Worth Living

Spring is here! A Poem to Celebrate!

Awhile back, like in October, I published the following poem, which I found in an obscure South Dakota centennial book.  I was thinking about it this morning, as I was checking out the bad, horrible weather in South Dakota, where my extended family lives.  (Glad I’m not there!)  It’s just snowing and snowing and snowing.  So I thought they might need a little poem to cheer themselves up.

It is spring, after all.

1024px-Young_steer_after_blizzard_-_NOAA.jpg
This was the view out my parent’s front window this morning.  Ok not really.  I found it on Wikimedia Commons.  But I’ve been informed it’s just as bad.

Without further ado, here it is, dedicated to you poor people suffering from an April blizzard.  My remarks are bracketed.

Winter [read spring] in South Dakota

It’s winter [spring] in South Dakota
And the gentle breezes blow
Seventy miles an hour,
At thirty-five below.

Oh, how I love South Dakota,
When the snow’s up to your butt. [Goodness, the language of some people!]
You take a breath of winter [spring] in
And your nose gets frozen shut.

Yes, the weather here is wonderful.
So I guess I’ll hang around.
I could never leave South Dakota
I’m frozen to the ground!

Gale_Henry.jpg

Now I know that some of you live in warmer climates.  You know who you are.  You’re probably reading this on your iPhone, sitting on your deck, listening to birds sing, while the rest of us are freezing our tushies off and drinking anything hot to stay alive.  I’ll have you know, we currently have an outdoor windchill temperature of 19 degrees, but at least it’s not snowing here, yet.

Furthermore, the little children requested Christmas music this morning.  Christmas music.  They thought that maybe it was December again?

Oh, dear!

Homeschooling

The Homeschool Room

In our old home, we didn’t have a homeschool room.  Rather, I was very creative about where I placed our homeschool materials–on shelves in the living room, in kitchen cabinets, or in bedroom closets…anywhere.

And the children worked just about anywhere too.  In fact, we even had a card table set up in the basement storage room where The Eldest preferred to do her math, as it was a quiet spot.  One does get creative with limited amounts of space.

Thankfully, however, our current home has 5 bedrooms: one for my husband and me, one for the baby, one for the 3 girls, one for the 3 boys, and one for homeschooling.  Deo Gratias.

The Homeschool Room

Now, we’re trying to educate our children classically.  Just what does that mean?  If you’ve got twenty minutes, I strongly encourage you to listen to Andrew Kern’s podcast, The Top 5 Ideals That Any Classical School Should Employ.  It’s awesome.  And I mean, awesome, as in awe-inspiring.

But…

How does that relate to my homeschool room?

IMG_1023.jpg

In order to educate all these children, I need a space that is neat, simple, and beautiful, if possible.

Neat?  Most days.  Although it does happen that the boys will take out their circuits and leave them all over the room, and the Two-Year-Old will decide to shred an entire notebook to pieces.

Simple?  Sigh.  I operate a school.  Therefore, I must have some supplies, but these need not be in overabundance.  For example, do I really need those nifty magnetic shapes that everybody else has?  Nope.  (Although I secretly think they’re the coolest thing ever.)  Or how about a bucket full of markers?  Definitely not.

The third one?  Beauty?  I’m always harping on beauty, because it matters!  After all, Ratzinger once said, it’s martyrs and the arts that will evangelize the world, not all your committees and words.  Shoot, I came back into the Church through studying Church architecture, painting, and sculpture.*  One can only stare at Brunelleschi, Fra Angelico, and Wislawa Kwiatkowska for so long until one begins to ask questions.

In any case, today I’ll show you what works for us.

IMG_1021.jpg

In our homeschool room, you’ll see a table and chairs, where The Eldest prefers to do her school work because she can shut the door.  The other children like to carry their work out to the kitchen to be near me.

On the walls in here you’ll see a picture of B16 (our affectionate name for Pope Benedict XVI), two maps, a history timeline, the alphabet, and numbers.  These are all practical things, but I’ve also tried to place them proportionally on the walls.  (Proportion is so important that St. Thomas Aquinas names it as one of the three elements of beauty.)

The other side of the room features our computer work space and bookshelves.

IMG_1025.jpg
These are mostly our school history, science, and religion books.  Our other literature books are in a different room.

Lastly, we have the closet, which is a blessing.  No longer must I run from room-to-room in order to gather my daily supplies.  They’re all just here.

IMG_1018.jpg

And here’s a look at the inside of both sides:

IMG_1020.jpg
This side features the children’s completed work trays, cubbies, my answer keys on one of the upper shelves, and a few games on top.
IMG_1019.jpg
This side has the children’s puzzles with DVDs on the top shelf and a few art supplies on the lower shelf.

In a previous post I went into detail about educational supplies or “toys” HERE.

And that, my friends, completes the tour of our Homeschool Room.  But I’ll leave you with three things that I’m continually working on:

  1. It’s better to have less.
  2. How I organize my space matters, because beauty matters.
  3. And, less is really better.  (Except for books.)
*This is why ugly churches and bad art are a sin.  They convert no one.