Call Me Catholic

Kids and Lent

It’s not too late!  Would you like any ideas for your children during this Lenten Season?  If so, read on.  If not, I’ll see you next time.

The Children: Lent 2021

Before you read on, however, I want to remind you that all families are different, and just because the following works for us, doesn’t necessarily mean that it’ll work for you.  I only offer this with the thought that it may give you an idea or two, if you’d like one.

Without further ado…

The 3 pillars of Lent are prayer, fasting, and almsgiving.  So I’ll break it down for you.

Prayer

The four older children join my husband and me every morning for Lauds.  I’ve written about it here.  Even though we’ve been doing this for years, most mornings the children are in a drowsy stupor.  We’d like for them to be more intentional during this time, if possible.  So we’re working on it.  The Eldest has her own breviary; it’s likely time to invest in books for the boys too.

At breakfast every morning I normally read aloud from the Bible, but during Lent, I’m reading the Mass propers and readings from our 1962 missal, this is especially beautiful because the readings correspond to the Stational Churches, which my husband reads in the evening.

If you’re not familiar with the Roman Stational Churches, you’re missing out!  They are ancient; they are holy.  Click HERE for the particular booklet that I’m talking about, which is available from Biretta Books.  (Or was available.)  NLM, however, does a great job of posting actual pictures of the churches in Rome with commentary.  Click HERE for an example.

We are also praying St. Alphonsus Liguori’s Stations of the Cross in our home every Friday night.  A few years ago my husband had ordered a bunch of those booklets from Tan Publishing.  When Friday night rolls around, the girls and I grab a copy, the boys process with lighted candles, and my husband leads the prayers in front of homemade plaques that a dear friend of mine gave me a few years ago.  It’s lovely.

Fasting

The children are all too young to do any serious fasting, but they’re not too young to begin somewhere.  Since all them are capable of abstaining from desserts and candy for 46 days, they do that.  Of course we don’t eat meat on Fridays, but that’s a given.  We do that all year around anyway.

But the older children can do more.  On Fridays, they eat plain bread for breakfast, and then during Lent, they add a day–Wednesdays.

Almsgiving

As the children don’t earn any money at all, this one’s out.

Let Us Know!

If you have any other great ideas, I’d love to hear about them.

Lastly…Need a boost?  My husband and I greatly enjoyed Patrick Coffin’s interview with Tony Roman, a restaurant owner in California who’s fighting back.  (How I wish more men would follow his example.)  His heroes are Jesus Christ and George Washington.  Watch it now, for I’ll bet it gets censored and disappears.

4 thoughts on “Kids and Lent”

  1. Lovely ideas!!
    For almsgiving, we talked (and continue to talk about) the corporal and spiritual works of mercy, and then find ways to “give” to each other through those. Also, finding clothes and toys to donate, taking a part of a monetary gift to give to the pregnancy resource center (which doesn’t happen often), and allowing them to choose food to donate to the food shelf. Our kids don’t earn money either, but this is a way they can still start the practice of almsgiving, even if it’s not perfect.

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  2. Thank you for the great ideas! Our kids have regular daily jobs and the Saturday cleaning jobs they do regularly. We don’t give allowances because we think that some things you just need to do as part of the family. However, during Lent, there are extra jobs (think extra spring cleaning) that the kids can choose to do and earn money for doing that goes into the alms box (a small wooden box painted gold) on the table. For the younger children, they can earn alms for the poor by doing their regular jobs (making a bed) without reminders or whining and with a good attitude of service. Also, I know another family that selects a charity to support. The kids ask people for donations at church, from extended family, etc. and raise money that way. Have a blessed Lent!

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