Book Review

4 Book Reviews in Short

I’ve read a few books recently, which might be of interest to some.  Here are my brief remarks.

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One Beautiful Dream by Jennifer Fulwiler

This is Fulwiler’s second book wherein she details the process of writing her first book and discovering her “blue flame.”  Her first book Something Other Than God was better.

However, I think One Beautiful Dream would interest those mothers who are really struggling and maybe drowning in diapers and Cheetos because she’s hilarious to read.  And let me tell you, her life sounds very chaotic.  The reason why I can’t give it a full, hearty recommendation is that I think it’s lacking something.  It would be a richer book if she had included what her family’s prayer life looked like (or didn’t look like) during those hectic years.

I recommend this book for:  Struggling mothers looking to commiserate or mothers who are feeling guilty about working a little on the side.

The Fields of Home by Ralph Moody

This is the fifth book in Ralph Moody’s Little Britches series.  Our family read and listened to the first four books via Audible, and I cannot tell you how much we enjoyed them.  They are excellent.  If you do not own the first four books in this series, you are missing out.  Yes, it is true that sometimes the language is rough, including such words as hell and damn, but they are always used in a such a way that the reader knows that it’s not the way one should speak.  Let me repeat, Moody’s first four books are awesome.

So, the fifth book, Fields of Home.  I intentionally previewed this book because my older children naturally wanted to read it after devouring the first four, but had held off because I heard that they contained material requiring a more mature audience.  And this is true.  While Ralph comes to live with his cranky grandfather, he notices a beautiful neighbor girl and wants to kiss her.  This gets a little tricky.

In the end, I’d hold off on this book until your children are a bit more mature.  The book  just isn’t as good as the other four books anyway.  I was bored from time-to-time because he waxes technical in his descriptions of farm life around the turn of the twentieth century.  But maybe older boys would like that?

Shaking the Nickel Bush by Ralph Moody

This is the sixth book in Moody’s Little Britches series and also not as good as the first four.  Again, my attention drifted from time-to-time, especially in his detailed descriptions of early 1900 cars.  This book, like the fifth, also requires a more mature audience, but for a different reason.  The main character, Ralph, lies to his mother about what he’s doing so as not to worry her.  This is problematic.  But then he also hooks up with a good-for-nothing mooch who in the end teaches Moody a lesson, which is good.

**The Nazi Officer’s Wife by Edith Hahn Beer**

**Go Get this nonfictional book now and read it!**

I was fascinated and horrified by this book and couldn’t put it down.  Edith Hahn Beer, a young Jewish law student, survived WWII by taking upon a false identity, which eventually gets her married to a German officer.  But that didn’t happen until about halfway through the war, after she was forced into the ghetto and sent to work as a field hand.  She watched in horror as the world around her became a living Hell.

The eery thing is, many of the movements leading up to this war remind me of what’s going on in our culture, and this book exposes it all.

Warning.  There is definitely mature material in this book.  If you’re up for it, however, read it.